Unnamed pie recipe

Note: Somebody help me name this thing! :)

Serves 8.

Base liquid
4 dl water
2 dl (red) grape juice
0.5 dl white vinegar (10 % acid)
50 g baker’s yeast
100 g sugar
Base solids
2 dl oatmeal
1 dl oat bran
1 dl rye bran
2 dl textured soy protein
Seasoning
1 g cardamom
to taste:
garlic
oregano
mint
Flour
ca. 6 dl wheat flour (bread flour)
Finishing touches
1 dl oil
100 g grated cheese
  1. Mix the base liquid ingredients in the tin, making sure that the finished liquid is lukewarm (~37 °C), and that the yeast is thoroughly dissolved. The tin must be large enough that this mixture takes less than a third of the volume available.
  2. Add the base solids and mix thoroughly.
  3. Add the seasonings.
  4. Add the flour in small batches, kneading the would-be dough well after each batch. There is enough flour in the mixture when it starts behaving like dough instead of gruel. The dough can well be fairly loose.
  5. Mix in the oil.
  6. Put the tin containing the dough in a warm place with no draught, cover it with a cloth, and let the dough leaven for about 30 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size.
  7. Bake in an oven preheated to 200 °C for an hour.
  8. When the pie is almost ready, cover it with the cheese and put it back to the oven, letting the cheese melt.

Serve warm (reheating if necessary) with fresh vegetables.

Rough nutrient breakdown

Computed from recipe and individual ingredient nutrient content.

recipe
Energy 16200 kJ
(3870 kcal)
Carbohydrates 494 g 52 E%
– sugar 100 g 10 E%
Protein 143 g 15 E%
Fat 139 g 33 E%
Dietary fiber 38 g 2.32 g/MJ

This pie is high in both fat and sugar, but both are within the limits of recommended intake for healthy adults. Just make sure to have the other parts of the meal to be similarly or better balanced in terms of sugar and fat :)

5 thoughts on “Unnamed pie recipe

  1. Does the reciepe have any close relatives? It does not look (the reciepe, all pies look the same :)) like anything I’ve ever cooked. Picking the name according to the special ingredient(s) would be a good idea. Possibly “grape juice pie”?

  2. So is that sweet or is it a real food? I’m quite confused here. I thought it was a sweetish-kind of pie, but then you have cabbage on there.
    Hmm.

  3. There are sweet real foods there, honest!

    This started out as an experiment in creating a high-fiber dessert, but I soon learned that the way I was making it created a “real food”, as you call it, instead (and it’s not fibery enough to be called high-fiber:). I eat it with whatever fresh veggies I might have (cabbage now), fruit and milk as my main food currently :) The picture is of my second attempt, the recipe is based on my third attempt at making this (which differs from the second only slightly).

    It’s sweet, but it’s also sour. I think it goes both ways, as a main meal or as dessert. The serving size (1/8 of the recipe) is calculated in terms of the main part of a normal-weight person’s meal; if you want to serve it as dessert, I recommend using smaller servings (1/15 of the recipe, for example).

  4. Hi Ajk,
    It seems like it could be indian-inspired if you lost the garlic and oregano. There are many interesting india sweets with cardamon and cheese and other things. I’d investigate some india recipies and see if you can move it more in that directions. I love india sweets!
    Cheers,
    Kev
    PS. maybe Jalhdar might know a good recipe?

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